10 расширений для opera, которые пригодятся каждому

What’s in an Opera extension?

An Opera extension contains a manifest file which defines metadata like the name of the extension, its author, etc. It also lists the various API permissions we want the extension to have. It will also typically have a background page or background script, which is responsible for communicating with the browser UI. Apart from that, it could have a content script which deals with changes to web pages. You could also need some other HTML (and related CSS and JavaScript) files for button popups or an options page.


Apart from all the JS and HTML files, you’ll also need to put in some images for the extension icons.

All of this is wrapped in a ZIP file format with the .crx file extension. To know more about the architecture of extensions in Opera, please read the associated article, which describes it in detail.

Download Opera’s Install Chrome Extensions addon

To install extensions from the Google Chrome Store into Opera, you must first download and install the Install Chrome Extensions addon from the Opera Addons Store .

Once you’ve installed it, just go to the Google Chrome Web Store in your Opera browser. Next to each extension you will now see an Add to Opera button which, when you click it, will take you to the extensions page in your Opera browser. From there, just click Install or manage other aspects of your extensions. Now the best extensions Chrome has in its webstore can be used in Opera.

To reiterate:

  1. Download Opera’s Install Chrome Extensions addon.
  2. Go to the Google Chrome Web Store and choose a Chrome extension, like Grammarly.
  3. Click the Add to Opera button.
  4. Click the Install button in the Extensions Manager (cube icon in your Opera sidebar).
  5. Voila! Enjoy extensions for Chrome in Opera.

Grammarly extension

Once you’ve gathered information, done your research, built an outline and filled it in (despite any distractions), you get to refinement. This can be a difficult stage of writing because, like any form of art, there is never a definitive level of being completely finished. There is always something that could be reworded, discarded or tweaked. Taking a break to get fresh eyes on your writing is good, and using web extensions like Grammarly in Opera will help you with grammar, tone, spelling, punctuation, and style — in case you miss something.

Writing is work, and writing takes time. But with the right Google extensions in Chrome or Opera, the process can be made easier and the results can be impressive.

Grammarly extension

Once you’ve gathered information, done your research, built an outline and filled it in (despite any distractions), you get to refinement. This can be a difficult stage of writing because, like any form of art, there is never a definitive level of being completely finished. There is always something that could be reworded, discarded or tweaked. Taking a break to get fresh eyes on your writing is good, and using web extensions like Grammarly in Opera will help you with grammar, tone, spelling, punctuation, and style — in case you miss something.

Writing is work, and writing takes time. But with the right Google extensions in Chrome or Opera, the process can be made easier and the results can be impressive.

Your first extension

Now that we’re familiar with the basics of how it all works, let’s try putting an extension together. We’ll make a simple extension that will add a button to the browser toolbar — when clicked, the button will open up a new tab and load dev.opera.com. This is a pretty trivial example, but it’ll get you used to the basics.

Step 1: Defining the extension with an extension manifest


The first step we’ll take is to define the extension manifest. This is where we define the name of the extension, its description, author, version number, and other such details.

There is another important aspect to extension manifests — inside we define the necessary permissions in order for the extension to run properly. For our example, working with tabs is required, so this needs to be specified in the manifest.

Extension manifests are written in the JSON format; we’ll explain the specifics later, but for now just open up a text editor, type the following into a new file and save it as in an empty directory, anywhere you like.

Step 2: Communicating with the browser: the background script

The background script is very important — this is where anything to do with manipulating the browser UI is contained. In our case, we’ll be working with tabs, so we will be using methods from the Tabs API in our script. You’ll read more about working with tabs later on, but for now, create a file named in the same directory as before and enter the following code into it:

Step 3: Including icons and other assets


You’ll need an icon for the toolbar button, and represent the extension in other places. For icons, we would recommend you read our article on it, where we discuss the appropriate sizes and best practices for great looking icons in extensions.

You may also need other files such as images, fonts, videos etc. You can include them in the parent directory, or create a separate folder (for example, a folder named ) or two, and place them there.

Step 4: Testing your extension

Okay, time to test out your extension. For the final extension, you’ll need to package and sign the extension from the Extension Settings page. But the good news is that you don’t need to do this every time you want to test things out — you can test your extension straight from the directory, like so:

  1. Go to the browser address bar and type (or use the Cmd/Ctrl Shift E shortcut)
  2. Check the “Developer Mode” button to enable it.
  3. Click on the “Load Unpacked Extension…” button.
  4. Select your extension’s directory

Thats it! Your extension should be loaded in “Developer Mode”. This mode gives you the ability to inspect various parts of the extension using the browser’s developer tools. You can also make changes to your extension’s code and quickly see the effects with the Reload button.


If all goes well, you should see an icon in the top right of the browser window next to the address bar. Clicking on it will open up a new tab, which will go to Dev.Opera — Opera’s developer tutorial site.

Step 5 — Packing it all up!

Once you are satisfied that your extension is finished, you need to package it into a CRX file, as follows:

  1. Go to the browser address bar and type opera:extensions.
  2. Make sure you have “Developer Mode” (located on the top right) checked.
  3. Click on the “Pack Extension” button, located on the top of the page.
  4. Select the directory of your extension
  5. Click “OK”.

Your CRX package will be generated in the parent directory of the one you had selected. Congratulations!

Download Opera’s Install Chrome Extensions addon

To install extensions from the Google Chrome Store into Opera, you must first download and install the Install Chrome Extensions addon from the Opera Addons Store .

Once you’ve installed it, just go to the Google Chrome Web Store in your Opera browser. Next to each extension you will now see an Add to Opera button which, when you click it, will take you to the extensions page in your Opera browser. From there, just click Install or manage other aspects of your extensions. Now the best extensions Chrome has in its webstore can be used in Opera.

To reiterate:

  1. Download Opera’s Install Chrome Extensions addon.
  2. Go to the Google Chrome Web Store and choose a Chrome extension, like Grammarly.
  3. Click the Add to Opera button.
  4. Click the Install button in the Extensions Manager (cube icon in your Opera sidebar).
  5. Voila! Enjoy extensions for Chrome in Opera.


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